Tutorial: Does Using Heat To Revive Your Dried Up Gel Eyeliner Really Work?

We’ve heard it all.

Tricks of the Makeup Trade on how to make your gel eyeliner last longer:

  • Store your pot upside down
  • Keep it away from harsh lights
  • Cap it tightly after every use, no,  cap it after each dip. Meaning open – dip – close – apply – open – dip – close – apply – repeat
  • Use a clean brush
  • Don’t add water with the intention to moisten it

Do all of the above, and still have your gel liner dry up right before your very eyes, even before you hit half of the pot. And we’re talking about a gel liner pot that is used daily. You can probably slow down the aging process with these tricks, but not prevent totally gel liner from drying out.

You know it doesn’t behave quite the same as before anymore, not as buttery and soft, application takes more effort and you see dried flakes on the undereye area. At first you think they’re flakes from your mascara until one day you decided to go mascara-less and yet still end up with them ugly dark spots. Not even the kawaii kind of freckles. @_@”

I’ve gone through MAC Blacktrack, Kate gel liners, Maybelline gel liners, Coastal Scents gel giners, Inglot gel giners, Lioele gel liner and Bobbi Brown Black Ink. A good mix of high end, mid-range and drugstore brands there, and they all perished in the same way.

So no matter what class of branding your beloved gel liner belongs to nor does the universe care whether you perform the Tricks of the Trade with as much diligence as Monarch Butterflies migrating during fall, gel liners will eventually end up looking like dried mud.

Sad, I know, but true.

You can see how cakey and dry it appears when applied to the skin.