Vertical Gradient VS Horizontal Gradient – I Made A Mistake!

You see, I was confused by information.

I was sure I knew the difference between ‘horizontal’ and ‘vertical.

I was also pretty sure I could tell how ‘horizontal gradient’ and ‘vertical gradient’ look like.

Just as I was about to write Part 2 of the Asian Eyeshadow Tutorial series, I enquired ‘horizontal gradient’ and ‘vertical gradient’ in Mr Google’s search bar.

Mr Google churned out search images that got me woozy and self-doubt crept in. Against my better judgment, I named Part 2 of the Asian Eyeshadow Tutorial series ‘Horizontal Gradient Method’.

And I’m sorry to tell you that I NAMED IT WRONG!


Eyeshadow Tutorials for Asian Eyes Part 2: Vertical Gradient Method

(Update 10 Mar 2012: All ‘horizontal’ terms in this post have been changed to ‘vertical’. Please read this post for clarification. :))

Hey guys! I’m so happy the first installment of this series (Where to Apply Eyeshadow) was so well received! Thank you all for your support! 😀

In the second installment of the Eyeshadow Tutorials for Asian Eyes series, we discuss the Vertical Gradient Method of eyeshadow application.

The Vertical Gradient Method is widely used on Asian models I often see in Japanese, Taiwanese, or any other magazines that showcase Asian models.

While there are no rules when it comes to makeup, the Vertical Gradient Method is one easy method of eye makeup application, and looks great on people with limited lid space, have heavily hooded eyelids, or have monolids.

The Vertical Gradient Method is basically dividing the lid horizontally, most commonly into 3 sections and with the darkest color placed nearest to the eyelashes.

In my opinion, why the Vertical Gradient Method is not as popular among Caucasians is because having just one color on the bigger lid space will not bring out the contours of the Caucasian eye as much as having more colors and defining their Crease.

On the other hand, the Vertical Gradient Method looks polished and sophisticated on many Asians because the lower position of the Fold and non-coincidence with the Orbital Rim creates a smooth canvas for color gradation. Monolids or heavy hooded lids will benefit the most from this eyeshadow application method.