For Asian Hooded Lids: Vertical Gradient Method Of Eyeshadow Application

You know that’s not my eye. LOL.

A warm welcome to Min, guest eye for today! Wheeeeee wheet!!!

Every time Min and I meet up, she will scream at me “WHERE’S MY EYE! WHERE’S MY EYE!”. HAHA. These pictures were taken a good 9 months ago but I’ve always been busy with other projects or just something else.

Finally I can say, NAH! HERE’S YOUR EYE!!! 😀

Min was so nice to allow me to use her eye for this tutorial. We did this on a Sunday morning at her house, rather hurriedly, so don’t slam me for the unplucked eyebrows!

Blame Min. HAHA! Kidding! We’re always making fun of one another. Whenever we’re together, we’re like two little childish people. ‘Little’ because we are of almost the same height (I’m probably taller by like 1.5cm haha). EH! You also cannot be air stewardess! HAHAHA! 😆

Min’s my really good friend and she played a big part in the initial stages of designing the Bun Bun Makeup Tips website. She helped design my name card too!

I mentioned in the Vertical Gradient Method of Eyeshadow Application tutorial, as part of the Asian Eyeshadow Tutorials series, that this method works extremely well on hooded lids and monolids.

Let’s analyze Min’s eyes before we start.


Eyeshadow Tutorials for Asian Eyes Part 1: Where to Apply Eyeshadow

Hi-ho-and-a-merry-oh, everyone!

Haven’t blogged for a week coz I’ve been working on a series called Eyeshadow Tutorials for Asian Eyes. Man! It was a lot of work but I’m really pleased with the outcome. I hope this series can help more Asians better understand their eye shape and those who have Asian clients!

In this 1st installment of the Eyeshadow Tutorials for Asian Eyes series, we take a look at where to place eye makeup on the Asian eye.

When I first started out, I had no idea where or how to place eyeshadow. My eye makeup efforts were previously limited to eyeliner and mascara and sometimes, just a light dab of ONE eyeshadow color.

When I purchased my first eyeshadow quad, I was lost.


I had no idea the eye could be divided into so many parts – lid, crease, contour, highlight, etc.

I had no idea that there are so many ways to shape the eye, combine colors, or use colors to emphasize or recede certain parts of the eye.

Google and Youtube, of course, presented me with tutorials and eye charts from their wealth of resources, but most of them were limited to the Caucasian eye.

It took me quite long to understand that I cannot copy the Western way of applying eyeshadow because one of the most prominent differences between an Asian and Caucasian eye is the ‘crease’, or rather, lack of.

If you haven’t already checked out my post on the differences between the Caucasian and Asian eye, please do. It will definitely help you understand this post better too!

You would realize by now, if you have read the post mentioned above, that while the Crease of the Caucasian eye coincides with the Orbital Rim, the Crease of the Asian eye merely defines the Fold of the eyelid. If you have a Fold, it means you have double eyelids – prominent or hooded.

It is the fact that the Orbital Rim and Fold of the eye do not overlap that characterizes the Asian eye, and not the stereotypical slanted eye shape.

In half of the world’s Asian population, there is complete absence of a Fold. For the remaining half who possess a Fold, the Fold commonly does not coincide with the Orbital Rim.

I am very proud to be Asian, and it is my wish to help as many girls out there to understand the Asian eye better and apply the most flattering eye makeup for their own eye shape and contour.

Here is, finally, my own eye shadow placement chart to share with Asians who want to understand how and where to apply eye makeup better.

This chart would also be useful to help makeup artists understand how eye makeup looks can be better applied on Asians.

The chart is based on my own eye – large, round, with prominent double eyelids, and does not coincide with the Contour Area. I throw in tips for monolids and hooded lids as well!

The placement of eyeshadows can vary for different looks, but here is the basic breakdown of parts of the eye.

I included pictures for every part of the eye instead of having just one complete picture with all the different parts outlined, simply because I always find it troublesome to read and refer to only one picture at the top all the time. Took me many hours to draw the outlines, but the result is definitely worth the effort. I’m sure you will find it more straightforward to understand too!


Now let’s get started!


Colorful Eye Makeup Tutorial: Asians Can Rock Multi-Color Eye Makeup Looks Too!

It’s a good thing I always write down, somewhere, the products used for makeup looks. I knew I would be less shy to put up more makeup looks one day. Yup, I have trouble with putting pictures of myself up on my own blog. I’m shy.

It’s just so weird seeing photos of myself on my blog, even though I have thousands of them on facebook. Maybe it’s because in those photos, I’m not smiling by myself into the camera, or taking close-up shots of my eye/brow/cheek/lip.

Besides, it’s so much harder to take photos of oneself! There’s always something wrong – stray strands of hair falling over the eyebrow, some fleck of dust sitting on the cheek, a tiny crumble of biscuit on the lip. For every photo selected, I have just about 20 variations of that, maybe tilting one degree to the left, or twelve degrees to the right. Gah!

I think I just have to get used to it.

So let’s start with a colorful look I did some time ago, when I still had my curly hair (gawd, looking at these photos make me miss them so much!).

You will need the following:


Face Primer – Monistat Chafing Relief Powder-Gel

Foundation – Stage Cosmetics Photo Pro Foundation (02 Take 1 and 03 Take 2)

Concealer – Amazing Cosmetics Amazing Concealer (Light Golden)


Contouring Powder – MAC Gold-Go-Lightly Studio Careblend Pressed Powder

Blush – NARS Orgasm Blush

Highlighter – MAC Beauty Powder Too Chic