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Salted Egg Yolk Cookies In Octopus Man-Heart Shape

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Salted eggs are most commonly found at tze char stalls in Singapore as people like eating them with rice or porridge. The yolks are also an important ingredient in mooncakes. I like the yolk while Mr Mode likes the white. In recent years salted egg yolks have gained so much popularity they can now be found in anything from chicken/pork/ribs/crabs/prawns, fries, pizza, pasta, ice-cream, vegetables, etc. Not forgetting liu sha bao! 😀

I wondered if anyone would make cookies with salted eggs, and indeed there are! I researched on a few recipes to conclude this one that I’ll be sharing today. 😀

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Salted Egg Yolk Cookies

Makes about 70 cookies

Ingredients

Pastry:
85g unsalted butter, softened at room temperature
40g caster sugar
Pinch of salt
3 cooked salted egg yolks, mashed
125g all purpose flour
10g corn flour
1/8 tsp baking powder

Egg wash:
1 egg yolk, lightly beaten to glaze
Topping:
Black sesame seeds

Method

1. Beat butter, sugar and salt until light and fluffy = butter mixture. I used a handheld mixer on speed 1 for this.
2. Whisk flour, corn flour, baking powder = dry ingredients
3. Add dry ingredients into the butter mixture and use a spatula to fully incorporate.
4. Stir in mashed salted egg yolks and gather the crumbs to form a soft pliable dough.
5. Wrap dough in cling film and allow it to rest in the fridge for at least 1 hour
6.Line baking tray with baking paper and preheat oven to 170°C
7. Place dough on a lightly floured surface to roll into 5mm thickness and cut into desired shapes.
8. Brush cookies with egg wash and sprinkle sesame seeds on top. Bake for 15 mins or until golden brown.
9. Allow the cookies to cool to room temperature before keeping them in an airtight container.

Additional Notes

The original recipe called for 2 salted egg yolks, I used 3 for a stronger flavor.

The original recipe kept the cookies to 3mm thickness, I did that but felt that the dough at that thinness was quite hard to handle and they burnt so easily. So in the second batch I made the dough thicker, at least 5mm and it was so much easier to transfer each shape to the tray. They also didn’t burn, given the same baking time.

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I love this cookie cutter hahaha it’s such a funny shape! It looks as if the heart shape decided to become human, then it miscalculated and grew 4 legs instead, so it ended up looking like a octopus-wannabe. Couldn’t stop grinning when I was making these funny shaped Octopus Man-Heart Shape cookies. 😆

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Below is how I failed in my first attempt. Oops! Those at the corners were so burnt! :( I think it was attributed to the use of the wrong setting – don’t use Grill!

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Second batch was wayyyyyy better 😀 Don’t be fooled by its pale appearance and think they aren’t baked enough. When you remove them from the oven, the cookies will continue to bake for a while.

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There! Scrumptious Salted Egg Yalk Cookies! WOOHOO!!

I hope you get to make some of these this Chinese New Year and let me know if you do! 😀 Enjoy!

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About Bun Bun

Hello! My name is Juli and Bun Bun is my alter-ego. I blog to share my love for makeup, how to apply it, and what works or what doesn’t work, all from an Asian perspective.

My first makeup product was a shimmery light blue lipstick which I proudly wore all over my eyelids and lips. It cost $2.50, felt like $250, and made me feel like a million bucks.