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Eyeshadow Depotting Tutorial: How To Depot Urban Decay Naked Palette Without Heat

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Were you one of the first who went all I-NEED-TO-OWN-THIS when the original Urban Decay Naked Palette came out in the market and made every neutral-lovin’ lady swear to own one and get it for all her girlfriends??

I wasn’t.

I took a while to let the hype hit me. By the time I finally got interested, it pulled a worldwide out-of-stock trick on me. GOSH! I had to wait like FIVE MONTHS for Sephora Singapore to finally have it restocked and get my hands on it! (Pssst! You can get it at Doll To Doll Cosmetics now!)

Everyone I knew loved it – the velvet casing that lent chicness and sophistication; the beautiful 12 neutral shades of browns, bronzes, champagnes and erm, more browns; the prestige of being able to get it at all.

Then one day I had enough of how troublesome it was to have to grab the palette for 1 or 2 shades, how the velvet casing had attracted dust and looked shabby, how my favorites from the Naked Palette made up only half of the full 12 stretch. I also got acquainted with the Z Palette. Never looked back since!

Check out my other depotting tutorials:

 

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See those with a dent? They are Virgin, Sin, Naked, Smog, Darkhorse, and Toasted.

One day I finally decided to rip my Naked apart. I loved how beautiful the shades looked in their original packaging, but I wanted those shades I like to use to take up as little space as possible and be able to bring them around without having to lug the entire palette along.

Step 1:

There’s no need for rubbing alcohol or heat. Depotting the Naked Palette is SO EASY.

Just wiggle a tool with a sharp enough edge into the gap between the pan and the skeleton of the packaging, which is made of cardboard and thus makes contorting super easy.

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In 10 seconds!

Step 2:

Remember to clean the base of the pan (with rubbing alcohol) so that your sticker magnets can adhere to a clean and smooth base!

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Sticker magnets are necessary as the individual pans from the Urban Decay Naked Palette are not magnetized. Here I used the square ones instead of typical round ones.

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You can write the name of the shade on paper sticker and paste it on the underside.

Repeat for all the shades! Or just those you really use.

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The mess! Hahaha!

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I place the depotted Naked Palette shades in the zebra design Z Palette, along with Sugarpill, WNW, and other makeup brands. I always change their positions to give the palettes and myself some variation.

Z Palette Customizable Palette Depot Eyeshadow

And that’s it! Super easy, right? 😀

I’ve received requests for a review on Naked Palette 2. Having already owned the original Naked Palette, I do not feel inclined to purchase Naked 2 simply because the shades are pretty similar – probably 5% darker, lighter, more frosty, less glittery – and I am not a neutral eyeshadow kind of girl. I love colors on my eyes!

I hope I’ve given you the extra push you if you’ve considered depotting your Naked Palette. It’s a big step to destroy a beautiful eyeshadow palette like that, but trust me, it’s worth it!

Let me know if you will or have already depotted yours! :)

 

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About Bun Bun

Hello! My name is Juli and Bun Bun is my alter-ego. I blog to share my love for makeup, how to apply it, and what works or what doesn’t work, all from an Asian perspective.

My first makeup product was a shimmery light blue lipstick which I proudly wore all over my eyelids and lips. It cost $2.50, felt like $250, and made me feel like a million bucks.