Menu

Don’t Shop, Learn To Cook At Silom Thai Cooking School

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestmailfacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestmail
rssinstagramrssinstagram

Silom-Thai-Cooking-School-Review_cover

Chatuchak weekend market, Chinatown, Siam Paragon, MBK, Platinum Mall are some must-visit places in Bangkok, but shopping isn’t Mr Mode’s thing and we couldn’t do any temple-visiting because I was on Code Red, so off the beaten track our itinerary had to be.

After recommendations and reading up on reviews, I signed us up for a Thai cooking class! We took a thrilling, 20 baht motorbike ride to the meeting place from Chong Nonsi BTS. Mr Mode’s was more thrilling and zoomed way ahead of mine. My driver probably sensed my fear of speed from my fingernails dug deep into his shoulders and went slower. Haha.

A trip to the wet market before class involved the introduction of different spices, vegetables, ingredients, some common around the world, some found only in Thailand.

Silom-Thai-Cooking-School-Review_1.2

Silom-Thai-Cooking-School-Review_6

Look who’s assimilating into the local culture.

Silom-Thai-Cooking-School-Review_5

Silom-Thai-Cooking-School-Review_2

Silom-Thai-Cooking-School-Review_3

Silom-Thai-Cooking-School-Review_4

Freshly grated coconut.

I was very intrigued by the sights, sounds and smells at the wet market. It was small compared to some I’ve been to back here in Singapore in my childhood years, but the last time I stepped into a wet market was years ago.

Oh, the last wet market I went to was probably Makishi Public Market in Okinawa, Japan.

Silom-Thai-Cooking-School-Review_7

So many OOTD-worthy spots on our way to Silom Thai Cooking School!

The route can be quite confusing if you were to take it yourself, so it’s best to be on time for the market tour and follow the guide to the school.

Silom-Thai-Cooking-School-Review_8

Silom-Thai-Cooking-School-Review_31

Silom-Thai-Cooking-School-Review_32

LOVE LOVE LOVE the old-school feel!

Silom-Thai-Cooking-School-Review_12

Silom-Thai-Cooking-School-Review_14

The school places great emphasis on presentation – the preparation room as well as the holding room (where we ate and waited so that the staff could change the woks and utensils) were thoughtfully furnished with cutlery and furniture true to the traditional Thai culture. We felt like we were being transported back in time.

Silom-Thai-Cooking-School-Review_11

Silom-Thai-Cooking-School-Review_9

Want food? WORK FOR IT.

Silom-Thai-Cooking-School-Review_10

Remember the freshly grated coconut we bought at the market? Everyone helped to squeeze the milk out for Tom Yum Goong.

Silom-Thai-Cooking-School-Review_16

Silom-Thai-Cooking-School-Review_17

Actually it’s really easy to make Tom Yum Goong. Just throw all the ingredients in, add coconut milk, let it boil and DONE! The difficult part is finding the right ingredients and spices.

Silom-Thai-Cooking-School-Review_33

I sent my mum this picture and she went “like real~”. Lol. REAL!!

Silom-Thai-Cooking-School-Review_19

Silom-Thai-Cooking-School-Review_21

JANG-JANG!! 😀

First dish only and my hair was already in a mess. This is what being a housewife does to you. LOL.

Silom-Thai-Cooking-School-Review_22

Ingredients for Pad Thai. I wonder how many little cups they need to wash in a day.

Silom-Thai-Cooking-School-Review_23

Chef Bun. 😀

Silom-Thai-Cooking-School-Review_24

Pad Thai cooked with love.

Silom-Thai-Cooking-School-Review_25

Laap Gai, not a Bangkok specialty, but a North-Eastern Thai dish.

Silom-Thai-Cooking-School-Review_26

Pounding the ingredients for green curry chicken with mortar and pestle.

Our teacher said in the past, mother-in-laws judged their daughter-in-laws by how finely pounded the resulting pulp is. So if you want your MIL to like you, you better pound until your muscles ache.

My grandparents had this in their kitchen, and as a child it looked fun to see their maid pounding hard and making loud clinks with it. In The Little Nonya this was the weapon of choice to make all kinds of delicious food.

But boy, was it heavy and laborious! There are smaller ones to make smaller amounts, of course. The best result is when you cannot distinguish between the different condiments and ingredients.

Silom-Thai-Cooking-School-Review_27

Silom-Thai-Cooking-School-Review_30

Green curry chicken!

See the lady beside me? Our classmates came from all over the world – Germany, Singapore, America, Korea. This lady was on a year-long sabbatical and decided to travel the world – alone. Wow, the courage! (and the money too)

Silom-Thai-Cooking-School-Review_28

The last dish – Mango with Sticky Rice, which we didn’t help much coz there was nothing much to do except watch the teacher prepare the rice.

Silom-Thai-Cooking-School-Review_20

Next time I cook for you okie, love? :)

We paid 1000 baht each, which is around S$40. Reasonable, for an experience other than mindless shopping, and especially good when you’re with people who don’t shop. On our way to and from the school, we spotted other cooking schools, so you might want to do some research before deciding.

That said, we had an enjoyable experience at Silom Thai Cooking School and I highly recommend it. You can drop them an email at [email protected] They reply very promptly and will provide you with all the information you need.

Getting To Silom Thai Cooking School

Take the BTS to Chong Nonsi. You can meet your guide at the supposed time, but if you miss it due to traffic conditions, take a motorbike to Silom Soi 11. The meeting point is opposite Narai Hotel.

I would recommend taking the motorbike coz even though it was a quick ride to the meeting point, it would have taken way longer on foot. Besides, it cost only 20 baht, which is about S$0.80.

Okie, see you in my next post! ^_^*

Bangkok:

1. Don’t Shop, Learn To Cook At Silom Thai Cooking School

2. Talat Rod Fai Vintage Night Market (coming soon)

3. Mode Sathorn Hotel (coming soon)

For a quick view of my Bangkok itinerary, read my Dayre Day 12 and Dayre Day 14. (Easier to read from the app, really)

 

 

You will also like:

About Bun Bun

Hello! My name is Juli and Bun Bun is my alter-ego. I blog to share my love for makeup, how to apply it, and what works or what doesn’t work, all from an Asian perspective.

My first makeup product was a shimmery light blue lipstick which I proudly wore all over my eyelids and lips. It cost $2.50, felt like $250, and made me feel like a million bucks.