Recipe: Chocolate Chip, Almond, Pumpkin Seed Cookies


If I had no restrictions to title length and zero aesthetics sense, the title of this post would be Chocolate Chips And Honey And Oats And Seeds And Flakes And Whole Grain Healthy Cookies. Hahaha. I love chocolate chip cookies, but they get boring after a while, so I really liked this combination of chocolate chip cookies and an assortment of seeds!

You could prepare portions of cornflakes, almonds, pumpkin seeds or your favorite nuts, or you could simply dunk in a cup of Post Great Grains. Everything is already in there. 😀

I love observing cookies, how each and every cookie looks so unique and imperfectly beautiful.

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Korean Style Mashed Potato Salad (Gamja-Salad)


My favorite side dish at Korean restaurants has got to be the sweet, creamy, mashed potato with a hint of crunch. I never get enough of it and even though most restaurants allow refills, it’s too embarrassing to ask for multiple refills, no? =P Heh heh. I don’t know why, but one day I decided to make my own Gamja-Salad. According to Maangchi, Korean style mashed potato salad is kind of a new term, hence the name which incorporates a mix of Korean (gamja = potato) and English (salad).

The ingredients are basic and can be found in most homes. So why not try making it yourself! It’s super easy and requires absolutely no skill. Heehee.


  • 3 medium sized potatoes, around 400g
  • 3 eggs – hard boiled, yolks and white separated
  • 1 carrot – chopped
  • 1/2 cup mayonnaise
  • 2 tbsp honey
  • dash of white ground pepper
  • salt to taste


Childhood Chap Chye With Red Fermented Bean Curd – Grandma Would Be Proud


When I was growing up, besides the other fabulous food and snacks and angbaos, what I looked forward to the MOST on the first day of Chinese New Day was the chap chye borne out of my grandmother’s kitchen.

Most kids who grew up in a Chinese family would have grown up with chap chye in some form. There are plenty of ways to make chap chye, and they all differ in taste – some are made with stock, some have taojio (salty fermented soya bean), some add flour, some add belachan, some make it soupy, some make it thick.

The one made by my grandmother was a meatless version. My dad said eating vegetarian chap chye on the first day of Chinese New Year represents a cleansing of the system, the welcoming of a brand new year. Something like that.

Despite its origins being a vegetarian dish, there are plenty of recipes that incorporate prawns, dried shrimps, pork belly, sotong. So whatever makes you and your family happy! =D

The Peranakans have their own methods, the Cantonese have their own dish origins, the Hokkiens seem to have their own secret theories too. But to me, it matters not the origins of the chap chye, but the taste of childhood.


Salted Egg Yolk Cookies In Octopus Man-Heart Shape


Salted eggs are most commonly found at tze char stalls in Singapore as people like eating them with rice or porridge. The yolks are also an important ingredient in mooncakes. I like the yolk while Mr Mode likes the white. In recent years salted egg yolks have gained so much popularity they can now be found in anything from chicken/pork/ribs/crabs/prawns, fries, pizza, pasta, ice-cream, vegetables, etc. Not forgetting liu sha bao! 😀

I wondered if anyone would make cookies with salted eggs, and indeed there are! I researched on a few recipes to conclude this one that I’ll be sharing today. 😀


Salted Egg Yolk Cookies

Makes about 70 cookies


85g unsalted butter, softened at room temperature
40g caster sugar
Pinch of salt
3 cooked salted egg yolks, mashed
125g all purpose flour
10g corn flour
1/8 tsp baking powder


Cooking With My Mother-In-Law: Steamed Herbal Chicken With Huiji Waist Tonic


They say too many cooks spoil the broth so with me behaving like a bulldozer in a China shop in the kitchen, I stood out of the way and enthusiastically watched whatever my new mother-in-law was doing.

My sole contribution to this cooking fest was using eye power and documenting the recipe so that I may one day cook this dish on my own when Mr Mode and I have our own home.

Nothing beats home-cooked food, really. That feeling of coming home from work, and being told “dinner’s ready” is the best thing one can hear, every day. So while I am still living with my parents-in-law, let me learn all I can! 😀

This Steamed Herbal Chicken with Huiji Tonic is surprisingly easy to make!

Ingredients: (serves 4)

  • Half chicken
  • Sesame oil
  • Pepper
  • Salt
  • Ginger slices
  • Black fungus
  • Lily buds)
  • Huiji Waist Tonic

As you can see, there are absolutely no measurements for the spices and condiments coz when mothers cook and you ask them how much to put, they say ‘agak-agak’.

I tried to press it out of my mother-in-law and she finally said ‘maybe about half teaspoon for the sesame oil and pepper, one teaspoon of ginger slices’. (How to measure ginger slices in teaspoon?)

You also need to soak the dried black fungus and dried lily buds in water to soften and rehydrate them before use.

ike dried mushrooms and black fungus, you will have to soak them in water to soften and rehydrate them before use – See more at:
ike dried mushrooms and black fungus, you will have to soak them in water to soften and rehydrate them before use – See more at:


Go to the market and buy half a chicken, request to have it chopped into smaller pieces (it’s only at markets that you can do personalized requests). I learnt that if you want to cook curry chicken, you need larger pieces. For this dish, use smaller pieces.

Wash and marinate the pieces with sesame oil, pepper, salt, ginger slices, and Huiji Tonic. My mother-in-law left it for 15 minutes. Actually I think the longer the better, maybe next time I’ll try 1 hour, or even overnight as shown by some recipes online.


Then mix in the black fungus and lily buds.


I must confess this funny fact. I asked her what is the name of this (holding up lily bud) and she said something in Hokkien. Lol. So I wrote down ‘vegetable that is tied in a knot’. Then I Googled this whole term ‘vegetable that is tied in a knot’ and discovered that it’s called ‘lily bud’. Lily buds are also known as golden needles, which is called ‘gim zam’ (金针) in Hokkien.